Blessings of a Cloud

Triple-digit temperatures hit Boise this weekend. This kind of heat is hard on people who work outside, the elderly, and those without air-conditioning. Remember to drink lots of water.

I don’t do well in heat. It all started before our kids were born. Hubby and I were hiking in Canyonlands when I started feeling funny. My vision narrowed like I was looking though a tube. I was really confused but knew enough to know I was in trouble. I told Hubby I didn’t feel good and he immediately took me to shade. We made our way back to our un-airconditioned truck. He drove around with the hot air blowing on me from the window while pouring water over my head. I started feeling better and well, life went on.

When I was out with a three-woman archeological survey crew, my second bout with overheating occurred. It was in the triple digits then too, but we had plenty of water with us. Only when we were miles from our truck did the youngest of the crew ask if we knew she had fainting spells and she felt like one was coming on. The other two of us gave her all our water which she promptly drank. We walked slowly uphill back toward the truck. It felt like 100 miles but was probably only 3 or 4 miles. As we crested the hill, we non-fainters were very weak from dehydration. I was experiencing cold chills which is my warning sign that I’m in trouble. We could hardly walk when we finally made it to truck. We downed what little water there was even though it was hot. I was elected to drive because neither of the other two felt like they could. Within two minutes of starting the engine, the other two ladies were asleep, and I was wanting to join them in slumber. Fortunately, we weren’t that far from the office, and we made it back. It took us non-fainters several days to recover from that overheating. The fainter never fainted and seemed none the worse for wear.

I don’t sweat much when I’m outside in hot weather which is why I can’t tolerate it. When I get cold chills and goosebumps, I know I’m in trouble. It happened to me again during a two-woman survey across the top of a hill miles from the truck. I told my partner I was in trouble and was going to sit in the shade for a while. Not a breath of wind blew so I fanned myself and drank most of my water, reserving enough to get back to the truck. As we sat there visiting, I worried about how I was going to get back to the truck across that very hot, treeless expanse. Knowing I’d have to tough it out as best I could, I said a silent prayer asking for God’s help. A few minutes later, a little cloud formed in the clear blue sky and sat between me and the sun. I told my partner we should go while we had the shade of the cloud. Right before we reached the truck, that little cloud, the only one in the sky that day, disappeared and the hot sun came back full force. Was it a miracle? It was to me.

God has done a lot of things with clouds: spoken from them, hidden mountains with them, held off Egyptians with them and fire, covered the tabernacle of Moses, and so on. On that day, God sent me, no one outstanding or special, a little cloud that let me get back home safely. I thanked Him that day and continue to thank Him for that and all the other blessings He’s given me. I Peter 5:6-7, Therefore humble yourselves under the mighty hand of God, that he may exalt you in due time, casting all your care upon Him, for He cares for you. Those last words are powerful ones. He cares for me and you. We owe him everything.

One Comment
  1. I love this post. God is truly in the clouds and Jesus himself will return in them. The whole weather system of transferring water and heat over the world is a miracle.

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